Courses

Chinese-Japanese (CHJA)

I. Introductory

120a. Introduction to Chinese and Japanese Literature (1)

China and Japan have rich cultures that have deeply influenced one another. This course introduces some of the major works of Chinese and Japanese literature, including philosophical works, novels and films. Thematically, the course is organized around the way that major intellectual trends (including Confucianism, Daoism and Buddhism) resonate in text from both cultures. Among the readings are novels dealing with love and sexuality (including China's Dream of the Red Chamber and Japan's The Tale of Genji), works about martial virtues (such as the Chinese novel Three Kingdoms and the Japanese play Chushingura), as well as selected poetry, short stories and films. All readings and discussions are in English. Mr. Van Norden.

II. Intermediate

290a or b. Field Work (1/2 or 1)

One-half or one unit of credit given only in exceptional cases and by permission of the chair. Offered only pass/fail. The department.

Prerequisites: two units of Chinese or Japanese.

298a or b. Independent Study (1/2 or 1)

One-half or one unit of credit given only in exceptional cases and by permission of the chair. Offered only pass/fail. The department.

Prerequisite: 2 units of Chinese or Japanese.

III. Advanced

300a. Senior Thesis (1/2)

Open only to majors. The department.

Yearlong course 300-301.

Permission required.

301b. Senior Thesis (1/2)

Open only to majors. The department.

Yearlong course 300-301.

Permission required.

302a or b. Senior Project (1)

Open only to majors. One-unit project done in one semester. The department.

Permission required.

303a. Senior Project (1/2)

Open only to majors. One-unit project done in two semesters. The department.

Yearlong course 303-304.

Permission required.

304b. Senior Project (1/2)

Open only to majors. One-unit project done in two semesters. The department.

Yearlong course 303-304.

Permission required.

350b. Seminar on Modernism, Post Modernism, and Hermeneutics (1)

(Same as Philosophy 350) The Modernism/Postmodernism/Hermeneutic divide stretches across many different disciplines, including philosophy, literary theory, history, religious studies, political science, anthropology and others. Roughly, these approaches argue over whether rationality, truth, and ethics are culturally and historically universal (Modernism), incommensurable (postmodernism) or dialogical (Hermeneutics). This course explores these approaches with an emphasis on how they apply in the context of one culture trying to understand another. Requirements include regular class participation that shows familiarity with the readings and many brief essays. Mr. Van Norden.

Prerequisite: courses at the 200-level.

One 2-hour period.

351a. Special Topics in Chinese and Japanese Literature and Culture (1)

(Same as Asian Studies 351) Topics vary each year. Can be repeated for credit when a new topic is offered.

Topic for 2013/14a: Chinese Linguistics. This course offers a systematic and comprehensive introduction to the whole set of terminology of the general linguistics in connection to Chinese phonology, morphology and syntax. It examines the structure of Chinese words, sentences and discourse in terms of their pronunciation, formation and function in comparison with and in contrast to similar aspects of English. It also highlights the construction and evolution of Chinese characters and explores social dimensions of the language. Topics such as language planning and standardization, relations of Mandarin with the dialects, and interactions between Chinese and other minority languages are discussed. Classes are conducted and readings done in English. Students with background in Chinese can choose to do projects in Chinese at their appropriate level. Mr. Du.

Prerequisites: two courses in a combination of language, linguistics, literature, culture, or Asian Studies, or permission of the instructor.

361. Chinese and Japanese Drama and Theatre (1)

(Same as Drama 361) A study of Chinese and Japanese culture and society through well-known dramatic genres - zaju, chuanqi, kunqu, Beijing Opera, modern Spoken Drama, noh, kyogen, bunraku, kabuki, and New Drama; a close reading of selected plays in English translation. Scheduled films of performances convey Chinese and Japanese theatrical conventions and aesthetics. Discussions focus on major themes based on research presentations. All readings and discussions are in English. Mr. Du.

Prerequisite: one 200-level course in language, literature, culture, drama or Asian Studies, or permission of the instructor.

Not offered in 2013/14.

362a. Senior Seminar: Women in Japanese and Chinese Literature (1)

(Same as Asian Studies and Women's Studies 362) An intercultural examination of the images of women presented in Japanese and Chinese narrative, drama, and poetry from their early emergence to the modern period. While giving critical attention to aesthetic issues and the gendered voices in representative works, the course also provides a comparative view of the dynamic changes in women's roles in Japan and China. All selections are in English translation. Ms. Qiu.

In 2013/14 Asian Studies /Chinese and Japanese 362 serves as the required Senior Seminar for Asian Studies majors. It also is open to other students.

Prerequisite: one 200-level course in language, literature, culture or Asian Studies, or permission of the instructor.

One 2-hour period.

366b. Seminar in Transcending the Limit: Literary Theory in the East-West Context (1)

(Same as Asian Studies 366) This course examines various traditional and contemporary literary theories with a distinct Asianist—particularly East Asianist—perspective. At least since the eighteenth century, Western theoretical discourse often took into serious consideration East Asian literature, language and civilization in their construction of "universal" theoretical discourses. The comparative approach to literary theory becomes imperative in contemporary theoretical discourse as we move toward ever greater global integration. Selected theoretical texts from the I Ching, Hegel, Genette, Barthes, Derrida, Todorov, and Heidegger as well as some primary literary texts are among the required readings. All readings are in English. Mr. Liu.

Prerequisite: one literature course or permission of the instructor.

399a or b. Senior Independent Work (1/2 or 1)

One-half or one unit of credit given only in exceptional cases and by permission of the Chair. Offered only pass/fail. The department.

Prerequisites: four units of Chinese or Japanese.

Chinese (CHIN)

I. Introductory

II. Intermediate

III. Advanced

Japanese (JAPA)

I. Introductory

II. Intermediate

III. Advanced

Flower